Posts in "Coaching" category

Inspiration Comes in Many Forms

We often look for someone or something to be “perfect” before we focus on seeing inspiration or to follow someone’s lead.

This Dolphin Tale movie is one I’ve held dear since first seeing it, and the sequel was even better than the original movie. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did!

First, get to know the true story…

In my world I see many people being held back by something physical or emotional, and learned that it helps me do better for myself as I take the time to figure out what children need, or what their parents need…and it always comes back ten-fold.

So this film validates how I feel, and that is that it is worth investing in others, and helping more people get the message.  You won’t know the difference you can make for others, and for yourself, until you really let go, and DIVE in!

See what is possible, and go for it!

While you’re at it, follow and share the inspiration found here: @CMAHope @WinterDolphin @dolphintale @ CMAquarium

 

16 Rules – Taking One Per Week

Which one is your favorite?

Don’t just read these or smile over a few; take one with you each week or month, and let me know how you apply it?

  1. Get and stay out of your comfort zone.  (WHAT comfort zone??  Nov 2013 is when I realized there is no such thing for me as a comfort zone. I’ve learned to be comfortable with uncertainty, with not knowing what is behind doors number 1, 2 OR 3!)
  2. Never give up
  3. When you’re ready to quit, you’re closer than you think
  4. With regard to whatever worries you, not only accept the worst thing that could happen, but make it a point to quantify what the worst thing could be
  5. Focus on what you want to have happen
  6. Take things a day at a time
  7. Always be moving forward
  8. Be quick to decide
  9. Measure everything of significance
  10. Anything that is not managed will deteriorate
  11. Pay attention to your competitors, but pay more attention to what you’re doing
  12. Never let anybody push you around
  13. Never expect life to be fair
  14. Solve your own problems
  15. Don’t take yourself too seriously
  16. There’s always a reason to smile.

Forget “One-a-Day” — best policy is to live with each concept thoroughly and get it right before focusing on the next.  I’ll add my own comments in parentheses after each rule, so please share and add your own as well.  What do these rules mean to you, and how will you apply them?

Thanks to my dear friend who knows my fondness for digital marketing leaders like Bob Parsons, and shared this with me recently.

 

Bob Parsons® 16 Rules for Success in Business and Life in General

Please read the entire text and share: Copyright © 2004 Bob Parsons http://www.bobparsons.me. All rights reserved. Reproduced with permission.

Worthy of What You Need

Considering messages given to us as parents, and to our kids:

Aren’t you thankful that you don’t have to be perfect?

child learning how to make a pot on a pottery wheel, old potter

Has anyone told you that you DO have to be perfect in order to be worthy of their support, or of being believed?

Many of us grew up understanding that if we were “worthy” or “good enough” we would get the validation, time or support that we craved.  We missed out on something and became vulnerable as we went out into the world searching for what we felt we needed that was not given to us as children.

As adults many of us struggle with having love withheld – unconditional love – in marriages and relationships.   We might also struggle with an employer who withholds positive feedback or makes us feel like we somehow don’t measure up.  We feel the sting of missed opportunities or of a betrayal.

Being told that you don’t measure up, and therefore are not entitled to support – or that you are not worthy of being believed or even protected – is a tactic that we hopefully learn to recognize as we get older.

But this tactic only works for as long as we allow it to work.

Once we get it that we really do NOT need to be perfect, or to be exactly as someone else dictates to us, we can claim our worth.  We can expect to be treated better by those around us.

This is the phase I’m in with my children; helping them see that their value is not attached to their grades or to their level of sports competition, or to which friends they have or don’t have.

This is also a common theme with so many parents who talk to me about what they are facing as they work through conflict with each other and with family court professionals.

The rest of this note is for the many parents who are expressing to me or to My Advocate Center’s team that they are being told, You are so flawed that you can’t expect any better in this situation.”  They are hearing these comments directed at them as decisions are being made about parenting time and parenting rights.

Apparently you must be “perfect” to be allowed to make decisions about the care of your child, or to be allowed to freely nurture and give to your child.  Certain professionals claim authority and claim that in their perfect wisdom that they can tell you – the parent – that you do not measure up somehow, and that you must be fearful and in some cases be prepared to BUY time with your children.

Of course, no one is showing these parents what “perfect” looks like.  And parents in most cases are not given the chance improve upon their alleged shortcomings before finding out they’ve lost everything.  Many are not even allowed to see the results of their evaluations and tests to learn what their actual flaws and faults are…when those things are being used to take away CHILDREN.

No, it’s not right how these parents are being treated – and it’s not right what is being done to their children in the process.   

There is no “win” in this for the children, only for the professionals holding these families captive and able to control time, decision-making and all of the family’s financial resources.

And just imagine how the kids feel seeing their parents under this much stress?   If a parent is beaten down and made to believe they are not worthy, and have no rights and no chance, what do you think this does to a child’s peace of mind, sense of self-worth and stability?

I can confirm for you that it is just BAD all around.   And completely unnecessary – – and preventable.

So let’s go back to the initial concept here:  if you are worthy enough to be allowed to parent your child, then say so.  Act like it.  If your child is worthy of having your love, time, nurturing and financial support, then say so.  Act like it.

If you are worthy of being believed and supported, say so.  Then act like it.  Send the right message to your kids by saying, “I am worthy of the best treatment, and therefore so are YOU.”

If the people around you – especially those who are working for YOU and who are hired to help protect your children and your rights – do not say so or if they do not act like they believe this, then why would you keep them around?

Aren’t you and your children worthy of getting what you need?   Please let me know if you still need help getting to that answer by emailing me through MyAdvocateCenter.com.

 

 

 

 

 

The Glass Ceiling

Someone came up to me recently and boldly said, “Who are you and where did you come from?”

I took it as a compliment and replied, “I’m an advocate working on improving community, health and performance.”  Where I came from:  Literally, Miami.  Figuratively, from a place where many don’t want to visit.

What you are seeing evolve online is the result of challenging myself to do more with what I have.

This began by watching young children in hospitals dealing with medical challenges – starting when I volunteered in high school and then through college, and as a parent of a Failure-to-Thrive child.

Then, as I watched disabled and in-pain wheelchair athletes compete and inspire a crowd, it dawned on me that I should be doing more with what I have.  So there you have it.

What are you doing to break through the Glass Ceiling that we place over and around ourselves?

What is Your Plan?

Marching Orders from a Media Guru

There is no better way to launch a new venture than to hear your marching orders from some true world leaders in the women’s empowerment movement.  So attending the Global Women’s Initiative event hosted by Womenetics  this month was perfect timing for laying the groundwork for My Advocate Center.

“Better solutions have to come from us,” was one of my favorite validating statements from Pat Mitchell, the President and CEO of the Paley Center for Media.

Another strong theme of hers that excites me is “transforming…with transparency and accountability.”  Being able to relate to a speaker named by the Huffington Post as one of the Powerful Women Over 50 left me feeling I was in good company with the objectives we have outlined for M-A-C.  Okay, I thought, we are on the right track…

If women can take charge and make momentous changes for the citizens of the Congo and for Kenya, using new technology, including mobile technology, then what should we be able to do with it here in the U.S.?  What should I be able to do with the privileges and comforts and connections that I have?  (I’m not daring you here; I’m daring myself.)

“When in the hands of women, we do so much with it.”  I hear you, Pat.

“Create change we want to see, but not for ourselves alone.”  For me in founding M-A-C, that would mean other parents, both mothers and fathers, and for our children.  It IS possible to interrupt harmful cycles, for example as in family violence, if we know where to look and what to do with what we’ve learned.

Carrying her message out the door, we remember these principles:

1. Find a mentor, and be a mentor
2. Take risk.  Worth repeating: Pat’s Native American grandmother said, “Falling on your face is at least a move forward.”
3. Be fearless
4. Be impatient

     I think I started with number 4 and am working my way up the list!  Actually I have found a couple pretty amazing mentors – so thank you if you are reading this.  Nothing is lost here.
     We appreciate Womenetics for lighting up Atlanta, Georgia with the minds of women like Pat.  And, for the great door prizes such as the one I happened to win – tickets to another thought-provoking event which I can’t wait to attend.  So look for another post like this one following the Chic-Fil-A LeaderCast in May, 2013!

 

Are you Using your Good Voice?

Were you told when you were young, “You know, you should sing more often…you have a good voice”?

I didn’t say “great voice,” I just said “good.”  But I used it anyway because I enjoyed singing, writing, engaging and uplifting.  Then I stopped.  No need to explain the Pause button; just highlighting the relief that comes from having the rediscovered freedom to express.

Along the way many of us are discouraged from using our voices because we don’t sound like someone else, or another who influences us decides they don’t like the sound of what we have to say; they don’t agree with the effect we have on THEM.  So we hesitate and tell ourselves we are satisfied with our supportive role and allow someone else to do the talking for us.

Rediscovering my voice and finding a way to use it has a lot to do with observing my children.   They need for us to tell them it’s right for them to use their voices.   Say what you feel, share what you believe…see your voice as a valuable resource.  It is there to be used, and it is there not to tear down but to build up.  Use it because you enjoy being vocal and because you want others to enjoy and appreciate along with you.

Use your Good Voice because someone fought for your right to use it.

Above all, make good use of what God gave you, including the freedom we have to speak up.  If you haven’t realized how precious this freedom is, just observe someone who has lived in an oppressive country where the right to speak is limited to agreeing with a dictator or religious extremes, or to another who has been held silent by domestic violence.

When you find your Good Voice again, use it for Change.  Use it for Good.

Deb Beacham

Compassion vs. Practicality

Empathy sometimes misses the point.   And that point is that we all need to evolve, to change for the better.

If you are too empathetic you don’t inspire or motivate the person desiring your empathy to change or find a way to help themselves.

If you lack empathy and rather want to be seen as practical and pragmatic, you can miss opportunities to improve your community and can even do harm.

True compassion is PRO-ACTIVE.  It is forgiving, invites tolerance, but leads with a spark or an intense desire to see someone else’s outcome improve.

The best form of compassion takes that spark and feeds it with some practical measures or steps and actually lends a hand in building something better — something the recipient can work with and carry themselves.

One of the biggest lessons I had to learn was how to NOT do too much too soon for others when I was asked for help.   It took a few too many times to figure out why I was doing that, so yes…painful, but the real challenge was to remain compassionate and open while modifying my reaction.  It led me to a new service offering for parents involved in legal disputes, or what we describe as, “How to Be Your Own Best Advocate.”

Helping others learn how to advocate for themselves is rooted in my many failures, personal ones as well as the gestures made to others.  While it does take more time, patience or flexibility, and often creativity, once you establish this pattern of empowerment and accountability, it will become easier, so think about your world:

~ children and step-children ~ married couples or single friends ~ clients ~

~ facing conflict / abuse, divorce, addiction, money / housing issues ~

We leave our world a better place by empowering others, especially our children, to create solutions and fix things themselves with tools we possibly provide or with tips we reveal.  Then we watch them carry their new and improved self over the finish line.  If you haven’t done this I suggest you try it – it is quite rewarding all around – and it creates confidence while decreasing co-dependency.

So, the next time you are tempted to JUST DO something for someone you feel sorry for, consider taking the extra time, using the extra creative effort and your last ounce of patience, to coach and coax them into figuring out a way to help themselves.   This way compassion doesn’t have to collide or conflict with practicality and PROGRESS.